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Hi All.  A year ago I started this blog because of my experience with Colorado Art Ranch(CAR)  and the residency in Salida, CO centered around water.  I became aware of CAR by an invitation to be a guest speaker at an Artposium in the Fall of 2009 in called Dinner Stories.  Grant Pound, the Executive Director found my work on the internet and felt that it melded well with the theme of food, agriculture, and community.  Several conversations later, a lovely Amtrak ride West, and a shuttle with Peggy Lawless, co-founder of CAR and Grant’s wife, and we were in the magical region of agriculture in Colorado.  A whirlwind of conversations, presentations, poetry reading and writing at an organic pear orchard on the banks of the Gunnison River, and so much more, and this artist was hooked on the organization, its members and mission.

Who can argue about the Science and Art melding as a catalyst for change in our world?

You can read more about my water related residency from my initial posts in 2010.  More importantly, I hope you read the interview with Grant Pound that I have included below.  I am thrilled to be a current board member of the Colorado Art Ranch and believe that the arts, along with sciences, can transform people and communities for a better world.  Come along with me and us to Salida, to Delta County, to Carpenter Ranch, Lake City and to other points throughout Colorado.  You may find yourself thinking in a new way too.

An interview with Grant Pound, Executive Director

Habitat, Symbol & Art
May 27-29, 2011, Salida, CO

ARTS +  PEOPLE + PLACE

  • What is the story behind the Artposium? What inspired you to create an event like it?

The Artposium, a word we made up to describe an arts based symposium, is designed to explore and issue or topic from as many different points of view as possible. Through presentations, performance, art, workshops, discussions and food we learn knew ways of looking at the issue. It is the synergy between art and scientific disciplines that provides this new way of thinking. Artposia vary in length from one to three days and are held in different locations throughout Colorado.

At Colorado Art Ranch we feel there is a need for this type of forum that showcases the arts as a catalyst for change and allows for a whole new approach to a subject. We wanted to create an atmosphere similar to TED or the Idea Festival, but with a focus.

  • What is this year’s Artposium about?

Dwellings, Habitat, Symbol & Art is an inquiry into how we live and why we live that way. We are looking at that very human drive to make and own a space for security, comfort, and more. Humans in the most rudimentary spaces such as prison cells, abandoned buildings, storage lockers, will do something to make that space their own. The word “decoration” does not adequately describe this phenomenon. The impulse is not only about aesthetics, but seems to have a deeper connection to who we are.

  • Is there anyone or anything in particular about this year’s event that has you most excited?

We have some wonderful speakers including architect Danny Wicke from the Rural Studio in Alabama. The Rural Studio is part of the Auburn Architecture Program. They take students into surrounding communities and design/build houses for those who could not otherwise afford a home. The architectural ideas and use of local and re-cycle materials make this program particularly unique. The dwellings end up directly reflecting the inhabitants.

The other presenters are equally insightful. Leigh Davis has photographed the environments that people create out of generic spaces. Christina Kreps is an anthropologist and will provide a more global look at how we live. Craig Nielson is a green builder and inventor of the Shelter Cart, a human pulled conveyance that converts to a shelter.

We have also commissioned a poetry performance piece about dwellings from the River City Nomads.

It will be a great weekend.

  • What do you hope the Artposium does for the greater arts scene in Colorado?

Colorado Art Ranch’s middle name is art. However, this may understate what we do. The arts are certainly involved, but we are promoting the arts as a catalyst for change.  We don’t want to scare anyone away by having them think our programs are only about, and for, artists. On a large scale we hope to raise the level of creative capital throughout Colorado. We want to see creative thinking brought into discussions and decisions about human and land issues. We are creating a model for how communities, artists, and scientists can envision solutions in our transdisciplinary collaboration in Lake City, Colorado, this summer. Hardrock Revision is a month long residency in Lake City to create a vision for a closed hard rock mine.

Contact

Grant Pound

Executive Director

Colorado Art Ranch

303.503.1132

grant@coloradoartranch.org

To join the mailing list:

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Take me Back: An Exploration of Water, local Clay, and Time

During the Artposium Wade in the Water, I planted corn in the center of the piece with Corn Sister Carol Ozaki (pictured third from left).  Pictured too are Carol's husband Ron and Ed Berg.

Corn Sweet (se) Luscious Zea mays var rugosa

During the Artposium Wade in the Water, I planted corn in the center of the piece with Corn Sister Carol Ozaki (pictured third from left below).  Pictured too are Carol’s husband Ron-L and Ed Berg-second from R.
We planted Corn Sweet (se) Luscious Zea mays var rugosa.
“Luscious is a bicolor corn that matures in 75 days – an advantage in areas with a shorter growing season.  Flavorful 8″ ears with 16-18 rows of very tender kernels.  Great fresh but can also be canned or frozen.”
Botanical Interests, Inc.  660 Compton St. Broomfield, CO  80020.
Visitors to the piece during the Artposium

Included are images from John and Ann Graham dated May 28, 2010.  I will say little but include those taken in the last 48 hours by my Art Buddies Ed and Paul Berg.  Wade in the Water indeed.

Images from May 28th. No corn sprouts yet.

Wonderful image from John and Ann Graham

Paula and Ed biked over to the piece.

Take Me Back... getting taken back.

The Arkansas and spring snow melt.

Special thanks to Ed and Paul Berg and John and Ann Graham for sending updated images.

We will see about images and status over the next week or so.

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I have been home for a full week.  I am still in awe of the green. My garden is a rain forest compared to the environs of Colorado.  My perennials look gorgeous; the pond plants are robust with our goldfish thrilled that it is soon to be summer;  The Girls (our urban hens) clearly have enjoyed the spring salad that the yard can bring; the Witchhazel looks lovely and our heirloom rose was in full bloom;  It is raining now in fact… all over the laundry I have hanging outside.

My piece went along quite nicely along the banks of the Arkansas River.  I finished in good time to work on some mixed media works  back at the shared space.  I had many visitors on my last day and early evening of work on site.  Sue Keys, local artist visited along with Michelle Gapp, the owner of the property I am working.  What a treat!  I have greatly enjoyed working on my own out there with nothing but birds wondering what I am doing.  I was keenly aware of the rare plane above my head (may two the entire time).  Most heavenly really.  I know that I am noise sensitive but having no planes above my head was a huge bonus.

When I finished, about 6:30p I rec’d a phone call from fellow artists (C.Maxx Stevens and Hyeon Jung Kim) and a local guy, Shannon.  They had visited earlier and I was thirsty, winding down, and out of water.  They said “Wait there!  We have water for you!”  They arrived before sunset and they generously brought an entire Mexican food-t0-go along with beer, and we dined on the banks of the river as the sun went down.  I finally took my work shoes off (no shoveling dirt anymore) and ran my toes in the cool, cool water.  It was a grand way to celebrate the (mostly) completed work.

Here are some images from both visits that day…

More images, thoughts, and links to come.

Sue Keyes and Michelle Gapp visit my site

Hyeon on top of Shannon's truck to get a good vantage. C. Maxx on the ground.

Shannon removed his shoes immediately. Delightful.

Shannon or Hyeon took this image for me from on top of the truck.

Our sunset picnic on the Arkansas in the shadow of Mt. Shavano

Sunset on Take Me Back: An exploration of water, local clay, and time

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I had a day or two of little work outside because of rain, cold, and such.  Call me a wimp.  I did want to share a video taken at my work site.  The first is one of rafters going by in the cold, rain, and such and having a good time while I waited for the rain/wind to stop.   The river was running swiftly but not too deep.  Several rafts went by with school age children and an adult or two.

The second video is of an irrigation system going in a field for what looks like oats.  Out of view were several deer heading to the water for a drink.  The deer are pretty domesticated as they are seen every late afternoon and evening walking the Salida streets, sidewalks and yards of a fairly urban small town.  Below is a still image of the deer behind our workspace on Hwy. 50.

Some of you have already seen a still shot of my studio mate Apache but here he is…. eating again!

Prep work for a piece. Water, tilth, dirt, and clay - My 2010

Darling Mules of Salida at the base of Tenderfoot.

Strange Finned Creature - I love an Art Car!

5 deer visit the back of our studio looking for us.

My First Visitors - Lillie and her horse Ransom

Michael gets to see One Strange Thing for $1 at the Flea Market. My treat.

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